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A Pop Art Quiz to Explore the Artist in You!

You think you know about pop art? Test your knowledge with this quiz!
Neha Riyaz Nov 21, 2020
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Pop art emerged in England in mid 1950s as a revolt against traditional art forms and stringent approaches to art and culture. In the US, pop art gained impetus in the late 1950s.
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According to popular claims, the term 'pop art' was first coined by the British curator Lawrence Alloway. But the British artist John McHale's son claimed in 1954 that the term was first coined by his father.
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The British painter, Richard William Hamilton CH, is known as the Father of Pop Art. He said, "people don’t seem to understand that an artist is free to do whatever he wants, and I’ve always relished that possibility. I do whatever I feel like."
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In America, famous exponents of pop art included Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, and Andy Warhol, among others.
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Pop art emerged as tool to appeal directly to people, With bold forms and colors, it was intended to create instance meaning out of an art form.
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The main hub of American pop art was New York. The city proved to be the perfect source of inspiration for artists in terms of media, advertisement, and entertainment.
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The colors used by pop artists are bright, vibrant, and vivid in contrast to other art movements. The predominant hues used are yellow, red, and blue.
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Pop art took root as a cultural revolution against stringent social norms, consumerism, and traditional art forms. It paved the way for artists to express themselves in a very open and non-traditional manner.
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Pop art was initially known as propaganda art. The Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi created the first piece of pop art in 1952.
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Andy Warhol created Campbell's Soup Cans between November 1961 and April 1962. It comprised 32 canvases with individual paintings, each depicting one variety of canned soup offered by Campbell's at the time.